thinking


Random quote of the day:

“I must write it all out, at any cost. Writing is thinking. It is more than living, for it is being conscious of living.”

—Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Locked Rooms and Open Doors

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Lucy and Ethel, Justin Bieber, or the Kardashian Klan. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

“Surely it is more interesting to argue about what the truth is, than about what some particular thinker, however great, did or did not think.”

—David Deutsch, The Fabric of Reality

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Lucy and Ethel, Justin Bieber, or the Kardashian Klan. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“Life does not consist mainly—or even largely—of facts and happenings. It consists mainly of the storm of thoughts that is forever blowing through one’s head.”

—Mark Twain, Autobiography

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

“Our idea of relaxing is all too often to plop down in front of the television set and let its pandering idiocy liquefy our brains. Shutting off the thought process is not rejuvenating; the mind is like a car battery—it recharges by running.”

—Bill Watterson, “Some Thoughts On the Real World By One Who Glimpsed It and Fled,” Kenyon College Commencement, May 20, 1990

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“I believe that in your life, in your thoughts when you are alone, you are always addressing yourself to somebody.”

—Nadine Gordimer, The Paris Review, Summer 1983, No. 88

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

 

“Myths are imaginative templates which, when laid over the world, make sense of it.  We cannot think without them, because they provide the structures which determine the way we think in the first instance.”

—Patrick Harpur, The Philosophers’ Secret Fire

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Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“You can be a believer in astrology and still be a good astronomer.”

—Eugene Subbotsky, quoted in “Magical Thinking,” Psychology Today, Mar/Apr 2008

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

I used to do a lot more pondering than I do now.  Not the fretting, worrisome kind of things that too easily occupy the waking human mind, but the big questions.  The who-what-where-when and why of existence.  Pondering is important to who I am as a person.  It was something that made me feel connected to a deeper strata of the universe, so I made sure I had time to just think about things.  Some relatives may have called this “laziness,” but I called it “creative dreaming.”

Anymore—what with work and taking on a greater responsibility for helping my elderly mother—it seems as if there are always things to do, places I have to be, tasks, tasks, tasks that interfere with those golden ponder hours.  I have to carve out special chunks of time to get any pondering in, kind of like those chunks of time for writing.  Often the two are in conflict and I have to forgo one to do the other.  And when I do get a moment to sit and think about things, it’s jangled, broken up, a vibration dance inside myself that has trouble being still, constantly interjected with thoughts of things that need doing and guilt for not doing them.

Some of this, I realize, could be from media over-stimulation, but it’s also part of not being a kid anymore and the distractions inherent in moving into a different phase of life.  I feel guilty even mentioning it, really, partly from those old voices whispering “laziness,” and partly because there are far worse problems.  My elderly parent is not an invalid.  She’s still up and doing for which I am extremely grateful.  I do still have chunks of time to myself, even if jangled.  I should be grateful for what I have.

But “shoulds” are not golden; they buy very little besides guilt.  Certainly, shoulds do not build empires.  And the razor’s edge of all this, the thing that cuts the most, is that writers require pondering time.  I know for a fact that the less time I have for pondering and dreaming waking dreams, the more my writing suffers.  If I am struggling as a writer, it is partially due to that.  So pondering is not just a luxury.

I long sometimes for the serenity of an afternoon reading a profound book, one that makes my mind spark fire and sends the pondering engines into overdrive.  I  long for evenings in front of the fireplace, no one talking except the flames, mesmerized by their flicker and not-quite-understandable whispers, journeying through mental byways to that place where all flames originate, where fire has lips and tongues that speak plainly about The Secrets—if only you could recall them when your reverie is done.

Reverie.  What a beautiful word.

I’d love to ponder this some more, but I have to go.  My timer just went off and that laundry won’t do itself.

Random quote of the day:

“Altogether, the style of a writer is a faithful representative of his mind; therefore, if any man wishes to write a clear style, let him be first clear in his thoughts; and, if any should write in a noble style, let him first possess a noble soul, and live a noble life.”

—Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, quoted in Conversations of Goethe with Johann Peter Eckermann, entry for April 14, 1824

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.