lies


Random quote of the day:

“Sometimes it is easier to see clearly into the liar than into the man who tells the truth. Truth, like light, blinds.”

—Albert Camus, The Fall

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

“It is always the best policy to speak the truth, unless, of course, you are an exceptionally good liar.”

—Jerome K. Jerome, Idler Magazine, Issue 1

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“Home is where you always tell the truth, even with your lies.”

—Skyler White, and Falling, Fly

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Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the want of contradiction a sign of truth.”

—Blaise Pascal, Pensées (tr. W. F. Trotter, E. P. Dutton, 1958)

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Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“I am a lie who always speaks the truth.”

—Jean Cocteau, “Le Paquet Rouge”

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Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

“A lie which is half a truth is ever the blackest of lies.”

—Alfred Lord Tennyson, “The Grandmother”

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Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

“Oh, Min, you’re the cutest cat in the world.”

I believe this, so this is not a lie.

“Oh, Minnie Baby, you’re the cutest cat that’s ever lived.”

This is only a half lie. Every cat I’ve had has been the cutest cat that ever lived, so this may be a paradox, but only a half lie.

“Oh, sweetums, you’re the most beautiful cat in the world.”

Well, yeah, okay. Mother love and all that.

“Oh, baby love, you’re the smartest cat that’s ever lived.”

I have had a number of cats, some of them incredibly stupid (I loved them anyway), some of them smart, so I have a good basis for comparison. Min is one of the smartest cats I’ve had, so there is that. But that’s ever lived? I have no definitive, verifiable proof of that. There may be some mother love involved in this estimate.

“Oh, poobums, you’re the best cat in the world.”

Again, I believe this, so no lying is involved.

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Here’s a piece of film from the BBC’s Antiques Road Show in which the daughter and granddaughter of Frances Griffiths bring in the photos and the camera to the show and are interviewed by the host. There’s a lovely “surprise ending” to this that left me smiling. Who knows the power of the will to believe?

Thanks so much to frigg for remembering this and finding it for us!

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Some of you may even have read the disclaimer I run at the bottom of all my Random Quotes of the Day:

The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. However, sometimes they do reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

A few of you may have even wondered who these Cottingley Fairies were who sometimes have obstreperous views. Well, one of my favorite history blogs, Beachcombing’s Bizarre History Blog, (endlessly entertaining!) posted a blog entry on them today. Dr. Beachcombing does a more extensive and entertaining write up then I will attempt here and I urge you to take a look. It’s a fascinating story about belief and the will to believe, of lies and being trapped in defense of lies, of the unintended consequences that can erupt spore-like from even the most casual of actions.

Basically, two girls named Frances Griffith and Elsie Wright came home one day in 1917 and told their parents that they’d seen fairies down by the brook near their village of Cottingley in Yorkshire. Their parents mocked them, and it made them mad, so they set about coming up with photographic proof that they had indeed seen fairies. They were so determined to come up with this proof that they cut out pictures of fairies from Edwardian books, mounted them on cardboard, and artfully arranged them in the foliage near the brook so they could interact with them. Everyone was amazed. The local theosophists got ahold of the story and ran with it, then the spiritualists, then (and this is what really condemned the girls to a life of lying) the great spiritualist himself, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who went so far as to write a book on the subject.

Do I believe in fairies?

Certainly not in cardboard cut out ones. A modern eye isn’t as easily fooled, I don’t think, as Edwardians. (But that could just be early 21st century hubris talking.)

Do I believe Frances and Elsie saw fairies that first day and that childish righteous indignation at being mocked for the truth led them to a twisted path of lies?

I believe that anything is possible, especially lies hiding a truth, and truths hiding a lie. I believe in the will to believe and the will to persuade. I believe that things unseen are not so easily reproduced upon command and the temptation to give nature a helping hand is sometimes overwhelming. I believe that is almost as tricksy an answer as the Cottingley Fairies themselves who, as I’ve said, are often obstreperous and contrary creatures.

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Random quote of the day:

 

“They say that in the end truth will triumph, but it’s a lie.”

—Anton Chekhov, Notebooks

 

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

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