style


Random quote of the day:

“Style is not something applied. It is something that permeates. It is of the nature of that in which it is found, whether the poem, the manner of a god, the bearing of a man. It is not a dress.”

—Wallace Stevens, “Two or Three Ideas,” Opus Posthumous

dress4WP@@@ 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

“You’ll have a moonlit night if you write that on the mill dam a piece of glass from a broken bottle glittered like a bright little star, and that the black shadow of a dog or wolf rolled past like a ball.

—Anton Chekhov, letter to his brother, May 1886
(tr. Avrahm Yarmolinsky)

(This piece of writing advice is often condensed, rearranged, and misquoted as: “Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” See the Quote Investigator column on this at: http://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/07/30/moon-glint/ )

moonlight4WP@@@

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

“I don’t think style is consciously arrived at, any more than one arrives at the color of one’s eyes. After all, your style is you.”

—Truman Capote, interview, The Paris Review, No. 16, Spring-Summer 1957

 style4WP@@@

 

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

 

Random quote of the day:

 

“Self-plagiarism is style.”

—Alfred Hitchcock, The Observer, August 8, 1976

 

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:
“Find a subject you care about and which you in your heart feel others should care about.  It is this genuine caring, and not your games with language that will be the most compelling and seductive element in your style.”

—Kurt Vonnegut, “How to Write With Style,” International Paper Co. “Power of the Printed Word” series, 1980

 

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

Random quote of the day:

 

“Fashions fade, style is eternal.”

—Yves Saint Laurent, Andy Warhol’s Interview,  April 13, 1975

 

Disclaimer:  The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

ETA: Fixed broken link.

Random quote of the day:

“Only great minds can afford a simple style.”

—Stendhal, On Love
(tr. Vyvyan Beresford Holland* and C. K. Scott Moncrieff)

*Some of you may know that Vyvyan Holland is Oscar Wilde’s son. Here’s an interesting article on Wilde’s legacy through the generations of his family.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this random quote of the day do not necessarily reflect the views of the poster, her immediate family, Siegfried and Roy, Leonard Maltin, or the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. They do, however, sometimes reflect the views of the Cottingley Fairies.

So, what is the difference for you between lush prose and overwritten prose?

I’m not asking to be a smart aleck or because I have an ax to grind (I don’t), I’m genuinely curious what the breaking point is for any of you who would care to comment.

I know that one person’s lush is another’s overwritten and vice versa, so some of it is a matter of taste, but I’d still like to hear your thoughts on this if you’re willing.

For myself, yeah, I do sometimes hit a wall with some lush prose where I want very badly for the author to tone it down several notches. Usually for me it involves the use of a lot of two dollar words when simpler ones would flow better, but it can also involve a great deal of artery-clogging images piled one on top of another. Still, other people lap that kind of thing up like cream—arteries be damned.

There probably isn’t a consensus. But, please, discuss…